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Fulbright Grants overview

Objective

The Fulbright grant has an international reputation built on the principles of binational governance, autonomy, and open competition based on individual merit without regard to the individual's institutional affiliation, geographical location, race, color or creed. The objective of the grant is not only to enable the recipient to pursue a particular field of study but to develop leaders who can contribute to promoting mutual understanding between the United States and Japan.

Thus, all Japanese grantees are expected to take one or two courses outside their specific discipline about the history and culture of the United States and participate in both academic and community activities. Upon returning to Japan, Japanese Fulbrighters are expected to contribute directly or indirectly to the relationship between the two countries through their professional and personal activities.

History

The United States Congress created the Fulbright Program in 1946, in the aftermath of World War II, to promote mutual understanding between the United States and the rest of the world, an objective that is as relevant today as it was then. This program's foremost advocate, the late Senator J.W. Fulbright, presented the bill to establish an educational exchange program only weeks after the dropping of the atomic bomb in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Over the years, the Fulbright Program has developed into the world's largest, best-known and most prestigious educational exchange program and has provided over 370,000 scholars and students with the opportunity to study abroad.

Today, there are over 160 countries, including Japan, participating in the Fulbright Program, which has played an important role in fostering the development of leaders in various fields. With the new challenges faced by today's world, the need for the Fulbright Program is stronger than ever.

Funding and achievements

Today, both governments fund the program on an equal basis. In addition, the Japan-United States Educational Exchange Promotion Foundation (Fulbright Foundation), established by the Japanese Fulbright Alumni Association in 1986, has collected contributions from the private sector and JUSEC funds approximately 40 to 50 scholarships each for Americans and Japanese to participate in the Fulbright Program each year.

Alumni of both the GARIOA and Fulbright Program (known as Fulbrighters) play leading roles in various fields, holding senior positions on the Supreme Court, in the Diet, in Japan's diplomatic corps, in higher education, in the media and at major corporations.

COMMENCEMENT IN JAPAN 1952
TOTAL PARTICIPANTS SINCE 1952 over 9,200
Japanese: over 6,500 Americans: over 2,700

Participants for the Past 10 years
Year Japanese American
2017 38 42
2016 42 48
2015 42 42
2014 47 45
2013 47 49
2012 53 39
2011 45 40
2010 55 40
2009 66 51
2008 53 59

メッセージ

“Educational exchange can turn nations into people, contributing as no other form of communication can to the humanizing of international relations. …I do not think educational exchange is certain to produce affection between peoples, nor indeed do I think that is one of its necessary purposes; it is quite enough if it contributes to the feeling of a common humanity, to an emotional awareness that other countries are populated not by doctrines that we fear but by people with the same capacity for pleasure and pain, for cruelty and kindness, as the people we were brought up with in our own countries.”

Senator J. William Fulbright

Quick overview of the Fulbright Program

The Fulbright Program is a scholarship program that has an international reputation built on the principles of binational governance, autonomy, and open competition based on individual merit without regard to the individual's institutional affiliation, geographical location, race, color or creed.

Establishment
August 1, 1946

Participating countries
Over 160 countries

Program size since 1946
Approx. 370,000

Annual number of award
8,000 grants

Funding Sources
U.S. Department of State (Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs), government of the bi-national commission or the partnering country, private-sector